Author Topic: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)  (Read 12549 times)

Mistress Sarah

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2012, 11:24:34 AM »
The external side of the Bond powers the Agiel. Most likely the Maker of it must be loyal to Lord Rahl. The internal aspect of it, the one that protects from the Dream Walker and lets you sense where Lord Rahl is... That doesn't effect the agiel's functionality at all once it has been imbued with the magic it requires.
You know what the definition of a hero is? Someone who gets other people killed. You can look it up later.

Unpopularprophet

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2012, 12:37:30 PM »
Richard wasn't loyal to Darken, and he killed Constance by Agiel...
But you must understand, the truly intriguing thing about opposites is that they are quite often so very much alike.

Mistress Sarah

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2012, 05:58:25 PM »
That's the point I'm trying to make. The existance of the bond powers the agiel independant of the user's loyalty.
You know what the definition of a hero is? Someone who gets other people killed. You can look it up later.

Lord_Faine

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2012, 04:52:52 AM »
Uh, my head hurts! Day am you vika!
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Gator

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2012, 10:09:18 AM »
Perhaps I am the odd-man-out here, but this book was awful. It reminded me of a bad sequel to a box office hit. The studio churns out a money maker that consists of nothing but the same catch-phrases that were successful in the first movie, and wrap it in a weak plot.

At the end of Confessor, Richard had obtained the power of Orden. He essentially held unchecked power over life. Being a man of unequalled honor and character, he used his power to do several unbelievable things. The world that had stood at the brink and beyond for years was thrust into safety, relief, and rebuilding. The people rejoiced.

Then, the day after the wedding, while Richard works to create the Dewey decimal system, he suddenly seems completely inept again. I mean, he is the master of the power of Orden, the keeper of the knowledge of the Temple of Winds, the Master Rahl of D'Hara, the Seeker of Truth ... and still bumbles around? Not only that, but it seems as if the other key characters (Nathan, Zedd, Nicci, Kahlan, et al) have become even thicker than before. They seem more obstinant and argumentative than in the past, and less willing to use their heads and listen to Richard once in a while.

And the people ... they had suffered for so long, but then within a day or two, they are all doubting the Lord Rahl and clammering for prophecy. Really? The D'Harans (and those from the other lands) were so one-dimensional that it was laughable. And speaking of laughable, if I hear one more of Terry's traditional little descriptive character similes or redundant adjectives again, I will pull my hair out. You know the ones, like every time he mentions Nicci he mentions her blue eyes, the black dress, or looking like a good spirit ... or with Nathan it is always his azure eyes, long gray hair, or hawk-like gaze, etc. When he uses these descriptive terms sparingly, or as necessary, they are fine. They come in handy when someone has memory loss or something, and Terry needs to mention key details so the reader will know the subject. But in this book, everyone looked like a good spirit. He over-used the similes far too much. I actually found myself laughing on occasion when the "good spirit" one would come up.

But, enough about the primary characters and their people. Could Terry really not think of a better villain? Really? Are you kidding me? I mean, the idea of going with a necromancer / hedge-maid, etc. may have possibly worked if it were not for the fact that after 11 books they were never mentioned. That being the case, his first attempt at jumping back into the series should have taken a little more time, a little more story, and gradually worked in to the mere existence of such beings. He should have explained them a bit. He was foolish to simply start a book and say, "oh yeah, by the way, all this stuff is here, I won't tell you how or why, you will just have to believe me while I rush through and skip pertinent details". I cannot abide someone spooning poop into my mouth while calling it pudding.

I think Terry is a victim of his own success. He wrapped up the series so well that he apparently had trouble finding his way back to it. He had shallow characters (old and new), a weak plot (an omen machine, come on!), an implausible storyline, and a rushed and uneventful conclusion. It is clear that Terry had the premise for the original series thought out well ahead of time, and this was but an afterthought. He would have been better to have a short book like this dedicated to rich character development, and an introduction to future threat. Or, he should have capitalized on the things he left for himself in the end of Confessor (Nathan's prophecy / undisclosed things Richard did in the Temple). Either of those could have been viable means to bring the series back to life.

I hate to be so critical of our dear author, because I absolutely loved the SOT series. I have read them 4 times and cherish the stories, the characters, and the truths that are displayed within those books. But this one ... I give it 2 of 10. I strongly urge Terry to take some time off and search for true inspiration before ever attempting another volume to this series.

vegeetasan

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #35 on: May 21, 2012, 03:10:50 AM »
I'm sorry to report that I'm a 2/10 guy too.

I rushed and bought the kindle version (more expensive than paperback too!!) as it was new Richard and Kahlan....

Same old stuff really except that Richard, master of orden (and the raptor gaze) still can't do diddly squat with his magic unless the plot dictates that he can.  Pillars of creation saw him blowing soldiers away with additive / subtractive fire bolt things.  This was never used again.  Why didn't he at least try some magic mojo on the hedge maid and her zombie things?

I can see what is going to happen down the line, Richards WW powers will have the counter to the necromancy and everyone will live happily ever after.....

Nicci Rules

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #36 on: May 27, 2012, 06:05:40 AM »
Perhaps I am the odd-man-out here, but this book was awful. It reminded me of a bad sequel to a box office hit. The studio churns out a money maker that consists of nothing but the same catch-phrases that were successful in the first movie, and wrap it in a weak plot.

At the end of Confessor, Richard had obtained the power of Orden. He essentially held unchecked power over life. Being a man of unequalled honor and character, he used his power to do several unbelievable things. The world that had stood at the brink and beyond for years was thrust into safety, relief, and rebuilding. The people rejoiced.

Then, the day after the wedding, while Richard works to create the Dewey decimal system, he suddenly seems completely inept again. I mean, he is the master of the power of Orden, the keeper of the knowledge of the Temple of Winds, the Master Rahl of D'Hara, the Seeker of Truth ... and still bumbles around? Not only that, but it seems as if the other key characters (Nathan, Zedd, Nicci, Kahlan, et al) have become even thicker than before. They seem more obstinant and argumentative than in the past, and less willing to use their heads and listen to Richard once in a while.

And the people ... they had suffered for so long, but then within a day or two, they are all doubting the Lord Rahl and clammering for prophecy. Really? The D'Harans (and those from the other lands) were so one-dimensional that it was laughable. And speaking of laughable, if I hear one more of Terry's traditional little descriptive character similes or redundant adjectives again, I will pull my hair out. You know the ones, like every time he mentions Nicci he mentions her blue eyes, the black dress, or looking like a good spirit ... or with Nathan it is always his azure eyes, long gray hair, or hawk-like gaze, etc. When he uses these descriptive terms sparingly, or as necessary, they are fine. They come in handy when someone has memory loss or something, and Terry needs to mention key details so the reader will know the subject. But in this book, everyone looked like a good spirit. He over-used the similes far too much. I actually found myself laughing on occasion when the "good spirit" one would come up.

But, enough about the primary characters and their people. Could Terry really not think of a better villain? Really? Are you kidding me? I mean, the idea of going with a necromancer / hedge-maid, etc. may have possibly worked if it were not for the fact that after 11 books they were never mentioned. That being the case, his first attempt at jumping back into the series should have taken a little more time, a little more story, and gradually worked in to the mere existence of such beings. He should have explained them a bit. He was foolish to simply start a book and say, "oh yeah, by the way, all this stuff is here, I won't tell you how or why, you will just have to believe me while I rush through and skip pertinent details". I cannot abide someone spooning poop into my mouth while calling it pudding.

I think Terry is a victim of his own success. He wrapped up the series so well that he apparently had trouble finding his way back to it. He had shallow characters (old and new), a weak plot (an omen machine, come on!), an implausible storyline, and a rushed and uneventful conclusion. It is clear that Terry had the premise for the original series thought out well ahead of time, and this was but an afterthought. He would have been better to have a short book like this dedicated to rich character development, and an introduction to future threat. Or, he should have capitalized on the things he left for himself in the end of Confessor (Nathan's prophecy / undisclosed things Richard did in the Temple). Either of those could have been viable means to bring the series back to life.

I hate to be so critical of our dear author, because I absolutely loved the SOT series. I have read them 4 times and cherish the stories, the characters, and the truths that are displayed within those books. But this one ... I give it 2 of 10. I strongly urge Terry to take some time off and search for true inspiration before ever attempting another volume to this series.

Bravo Gator. You really summed this up great and it hurts so much to have a stinker like this because we all love this series so much.
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MightisRight

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #37 on: July 02, 2012, 10:49:37 AM »
Wow... Gator you really nailed it. I actually stopped reading TG after SoT and will never read him again. I realize what type of author he is. He is one of those authors that creates and doesnít look behind. Every book has some sort of contradiction or other.

The problems with TG and SoT started early on with Book 3 and continued on.

You guys mention the damsel in distress issue? Not to be rude but come on, you are just now noticing this? I made a post back in 1999 after Temple of the Winds, basically complaining about the same thing. After Soul of the Fire, I had enough. His weakness as a writer really started to show.

He wrote himself in a corner with Richard and Richard's power and couldnít get out of it reasonably. His reason is the same in every book, the whole, I donít know how I fix it, I am a war wizard, and it just fixes sh1t. From page 1-500 in every book I canít fix anything because I donít know anything about how to use my powers. Page 501-550 I fix everything because I really NEED to fix it now.

He also doesnít know how to write a book without the main characters constantly being kidnapped or facing some extreme relationship drama brought on by extreme circumstances that just arenít believable.

Books 1 and 2 stand alone and are great. After that he realized he had a hit, his editors, his family, TOR, everyone. They all told him keep writing, make it a 10 Novel series and why not, everyone likes money. They problem is how he started off Richard and Kahlan. They were meant to be 3 books max. He milked the series with one made up thing after another... Chimes, Plague, Pillars of Creation. 


Sorry for rambling but long story short. He had a great idea and had time to build this idea. Books 1 and 2. Those books established precedent and rules about the main characters and story. After that he just had to adapt on the fly to continue cranking out books and stick to his rules/regulations/pre-established information from those first books.

This is the type of writing I do not like. I appreciate authors that come to the table with an established game plan and organization. Steven Erikson for example. He said he would write a 10 book series from the start and he did it.

It is much easier to avoid contradictions, changing of rules, same plots re-used in every book, if you have an end goal in site.

I didnít read omen machine and will not buy it. However, from reading everyone's summary of it, I can see that TG hasnít changed his stripes. He isnít going to. The only chance he has at redemption is casting aside the SoT universe and starting a new series. Unfortunately he is going to take the easy way out and continue writing the SoT series. His new book is about the first mother confessor 3000 years ago.

Sad that he refuses to grow as an author. I predict his new book will have the SAME feel as his previous books, Same "TYPES" of characters in same types of "Situations".


Tony187

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #38 on: April 09, 2013, 11:40:49 AM »
Really late to the party here. I have avoided the site because I have not had a chance to read this. Well I read half when it first came out. Then finished it because I another book is coming out.


I have to agree with the majority of people. 2/10 for this book.

Everything I don't like about Terry's writing was present in this book.The over explaining of every little situation. The scenes with Richard, Nicci, Zed, Nathan, drove me crazy. For some of the smartest people in the world they sure act dumb sometimes. One person who has a good idea has to explain and be questioned over and over again, like they don't know what they are talking about. Why? Why if Richard was in a hurry to be after Kahlan, did he have a good five minutes to stop talk to a random soldier about his home land and how dangerous it is? I bet if he didn't do that he could have caught Kahlan before she made it to Jit.

Why is Kahlan always being captured? I really never had a problem with this in the past. To me it all felt like it fit in with the stroyline. But this is rehashing plot over and over again. This plot reminded me of nothing more then Kahlan being captured by Shota. Everyone was scared of her. A witch womans powers were not to be messed with etc...etc... 


By the end of Confessor Terry made Richard so powerful that he has to basically ignore that to make it seem like there is danger. Temple of the winds sure the explanation is there. But the book would be over in all of 3 chapters. So lets just not go there and make it harder on our selves. He shouldn't even have mentioned that part of the book was there. It served no purpose.

The villians were not flushed out. For all the unneeded explanations of symbols, libraries, containment fields and other things we knew about from previous books. The couple new things in this book are barley shown or explained at all. Hannis Arc is bad, he has a mord-sith, Jit is afraid of him. Why? Not one of those things was given a explanation.


I love SoT. But I think it has run it's course. If Terry is struggling this hard to write a new and original plot, just let it be. The series was great don't "Jump the shark" with new books if you are unable to present new and interesting story. Not old plot points already told with the same characters in a new location. Because that is how I feel this series is headed.
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eondir

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #39 on: August 31, 2013, 12:14:05 PM »
Forgive me if this is the wrong place, but seeing as how this is a review and spoilers are allowed; can I ask what was the omen that would "tear Richard and Kahlan apart"?

I read this somewhere in a synopsis but I haven't come across it yet, granted I'm not done but I just really want to know. And don't worry, even if I know, I will still finish reading the book.

Ungifted

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Re: Omen Machine Review (Spoilers)
« Reply #40 on: September 06, 2013, 07:18:03 PM »
I quite enjoyed the Omen Machine. I find it odd that the Sword of truth was useless, cause as was shown in the sequel, it would against all of the other inhabitants of Jitt's homeland, unlike the gift.